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Added by MusicLover on 12 Nov 2017 05:07
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DEEP PURPLE STUDIO ALBUMS RANKED

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People who added this item 1 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Bananas - Deep Purple
21. 'Bananas' (2003)
Everything about Deep Purple’s 17th studio album was just wrong. With the recent retirement of founding organist Jon Lord still a raw wound (and despite the venerable Don Airey stepping in as his replacement), the band seemed to be sleepwalking through the motions, almost parodying a parody of themselves. The careless choice of title and album cover art only seemed to reinforce this perception.
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People who added this item 15 Average listal rating (10 ratings) 5.3 IMDB Rating 0
The Battle Rages On - Deep Purple
20. 'The Battle Rages On…' (1993)
The result of a somewhat mandated reconciliation with Ian Gillan after the poorly received “Deep Rainbow” experiment of 'Slaves and Masters,' 'The Battle Rages On...' holds the distinction of being Deep Purple’s unhappiest album. Yes, sporadic flashes of inspiration emerged in the unironic title cut and the sweeping “Anya,” but by all accounts, in most every other respect this was a miserable experience for both the band and their fans.
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People who added this item 8 Average listal rating (3 ratings) 6.3 IMDB Rating 0
Slaves and Masters - Deep Purple
19. Slaves and Masters' (1990)
You can’t really blame singer Joe Lynn Turner for rising to the bait cast by his former Rainbow boss Ritchie Blackmore and agreeing to join Deep Purple for 1990’s 'Slaves and Masters.' But the almost-universal groans that met this alliance were enough to drown out the solid, if unspectacular and suspiciously AOR-driven songs conjured up for this much-maligned LP. How could it possibly last? Well, it obviously didn’t!
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People who added this item 1 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 6 IMDB Rating 0
Infinite - DEEP PURPLE
18. 'InFinite' (2017)
'InFinite' illustrated that the comeback success of 2013's 'Now What?!' was no fluke, reassembling the same team (right down to producer Bob Ezrin) to achieve similar – if not quite as consistent – results. "Time for Bedlam," in particular, recalled their glory years.
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People who added this item 5 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 4 IMDB Rating 0
Now What?! - Deep Purple
17. 'Now What?!' (2013)
Indeed, a fair question since Deep Purple had no way of knowing how their fans would receive the group’s first studio release in eight years, and first since Lord’s sad death from cancer. And yet, wouldn’t you know? That close brush with mortality and the extended time off put some fire back in the old dogs’ bones, and fed their 20th LP with a newfound desire and eclectic song set that rarely amazed, but even more rarely disappointed.
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People who added this item 20 Average listal rating (12 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 0
Deep Purple - Deep Purple
16. 'Deep Purple' (1969)
Deep Purple’s first lineup (a.k.a. Mk. I) was seriously running out of steam on this eponymous third album. You can hear them grasping for direction amid the Summer of Love’s denouement, the as-yet unspecified concept of art rock, and the still-unclear rise of heavy metal. Hence the Donovan cover, “Lalena,” and only mildly compelling originals like “Why Didn’t Rosemary” and “This Bird Has Flown.”
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People who added this item 12 Average listal rating (6 ratings) 7.3 IMDB Rating 0
Rapture of the Deep - Deep Purple
15. 'Rapture of the Deep' (2005)
'Rapture of the Deep' lacked bowl-you-over songwriting depth, but after the perplexing, embarrassing 'Bananas,' it proved that Deep Purple was still a band that took themselves seriously . “Money Talks” carried itself with all due gravitas, while the bittersweet “Clearly Quite Absurd” was anything but, and “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye” raged against the dying of the light.
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People who added this item 2 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 6 IMDB Rating 0
14. 'Concerto for Group and Orchestra' (1970)
This full-fledged musical summit between rock band and symphony orchestra is clearly the wild card in Deep Purple’s career discography, but that does nothing to diminish its fascinating accomplishments. Clearly, this experiment, led by the classically trained Jon Lord, wasn’t entirely successful or it wouldn’t have been a one-off. But it was certainly important enough to generate welcome press for the transitioning Purple ahead of their heavy rock rebirth.
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People who added this item 30 Average listal rating (23 ratings) 7.2 IMDB Rating 0
Shades of Deep Purple - Deep Purple
13. 'Shades of Deep Purple' (1968)
Its hard to see the overnight success of Deep Purple’s first LP, 'Shades of...' as anything but a fluke, just like its undeniably catchy but hardly life-changing smash hit cover of Joe South’s 'Hush.' However, the formidable instrumental prowess and budding songwriting of Ritchie Blackmore, Jon Lord, et al was already evident in standout moments like the grooving “And Her Name Was” and the aggressive instrumental “Mandrake Root.”
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People who added this item 12 Average listal rating (6 ratings) 6 IMDB Rating 0
Abandon - Deep Purple
12. 'Abandon' (1998)
Though it lacked the consistent rewards of 1995’s bounce-back 'Purpendicular,' 1998’s 'Abandon' helped prove that Deep Purple’s second, post-Blackmore incarnation was here to stay. And proof was such standout tunes as the spelling-challenged “Any Fule Kno Dat,” moody “Seventh Heaven,” melancholy “Fingers to the Bone,” and very fiery “Evil Louie,” where the band’s pleasure in each other’s company was made evident by their tight performance.
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People who added this item 19 Average listal rating (13 ratings) 6.5 IMDB Rating 0
The House of Blue Light - Deep Purple
11. 'The House of Blue Light' (1987)
Probably Deep Purple’s most polarizing album (so it stands to reason that we find it here, halfway up and down the list), 'The House of Blue Light' tried to mask the rot already setting into the reformed classic fivesome as best it could. The result was two vinyl sides with quite different creative agendas: the first aimed at fitting in with '80s mainstream rock expectations (“Bad Attitude,” “Call of the Wild”); the second given to greater freedom (“The Spanish Archer,” “Mitzi Dupree”). But neither was entirely satisfying.
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People who added this item 4 Average listal rating (3 ratings) 6.7 IMDB Rating 0
The Book of Taliesyn - Deep Purple
10. 'The Book of Taliesyn' (1968)
Arguably the Mk. I formation’s finest hour, 'The Book of Taliesyn' saw the young group bending (“Listen, Learn, Read On,” “Shield”) but not exactly breaking (“Kentucky Woman,” the fearsome “Wring that Neck”) under the strain of psychedelia’s cultural onslaught. These days, Rod Evans’ histrionic voice simply doesn’t sound big enough for Deep Purple, but it would be shortsighted to ignore the considerable success enjoyed by the original quintet.
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People who added this item 28 Average listal rating (16 ratings) 7.4 IMDB Rating 0
Stormbringer - Deep Purple
9. 'Stormbringer' (1974)
Even with Blackmore already half-checked out, conspiring to launch his new musical venture Rainbow, the sheer talent of all those involved in 'Stormbringer' guaranteed an often spellbinding, if not always entirely consistent, listening experience. The bombastic title track, the funky “You Can’t Do It Right” and the uncharacteristic ballad, “Soldier of Fortune” were all top-notch in their own peculiar ways, but the rest of the songs suffered.
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People who added this item 18 Average listal rating (11 ratings) 7.2 IMDB Rating 0
Who Do We Think We Are - Deep Purple
8. 'Who Do We Think We Are' (1973)
'Who Do We Think We Are' is, far and away, the weakest album cut by the vaunted Mk. II lineup, which, by 1973, was fraying under the pain of incessant touring and the fractured relationship between Gillan and Blackmore. Nevertheless, they still conjured up some magic with the perennial fan favorite “Woman From Tokyo,” the hypnotizing “Super Trouper,” and kinetic blues shuffle “Rat Bat Blue,” before taking a nap across much of the remaining tracks.
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People who added this item 18 Average listal rating (11 ratings) 6.5 IMDB Rating 0
Purpendicular - Deep Purple
7. 'Purpendicular' (1996)
After the unhappy debacle that was 'The Battle Rages On...,' most everyone left Deep Purple for dead, assuming it would take a minor miracle to resurrect the long-in-the-tooth ensemble again, not least without the once-again departed Blackmore. But a small miracle is what they got in the well-traveled Steve Morse, who helped the group deliver an undervalued gem in 'Purpendicular,' especially on stellar offerings like “Loosen My Strings” and “Sometimes I Feel Like Screaming.”
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People who added this item 41 Average listal rating (29 ratings) 7.9 IMDB Rating 0
Perfect Strangers - Deep Purple
6. 'Perfect Strangers' (1984)
Deep Purple’s long-anticipated comeback, following a nine-year hiatus, 'Perfect Strangers' was well worth the wait, simultaneously drawing upon the group’s signature sound while modernizing it for the '80s. And while those then-new production techniques have dated the album somewhat, nothing can dull the lasting power of the suitably emotional title track, the devious “Knocking at Your Back Door,” and lesser favorites like “Mean Streak” and “A Gypsy’s Kiss.”
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People who added this item 26 Average listal rating (15 ratings) 6.7 IMDB Rating 0
Come Taste the Band - Deep Purple
5. 'Come Taste the Band' (1975)
Blackmore’s absence (he had recently departed to form Rainbow) caused many people, including Jon Lord, to dismiss 'Come Taste the Band' as something other than a "true" Deep Purple album. But that was before Steve Morse racked up more years of service with the band than Ritchie ever did. Still, the short-lived, Tommy Bolin-enhanced Mk. IV lineup snatched victory from the jaws of defeat with this imperfect, but oftentimes brilliant LP, including the exquisite “Owed to a ‘G’ / This Time Around.”
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People who added this item 49 Average listal rating (32 ratings) 7.8 IMDB Rating 0
Fireball - Deep Purple
4. 'Fireball' (1971)
'Fireball' is, in many respects, the most underrated and eclectic creation of the glorious Mk.II lineup. The opening title track was a bona fide scorcher, “Strange Kind of Woman” was a perfect single, the country-inflected “Anyone's Daughter” a career rarity -- and a hoot -- and “No One Came” an incredible ensemble piece, reflecting Deep Purple’s singular power in a live setting, but captured in the studio.
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People who added this item 13 Average listal rating (8 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Burn - Deep Purple
3. 'Burn' (1974)
Deep Purple’s Mk. III lineup saw the band swapping Gillan and Roger Glover for David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes. Their first record, 'Burn' is quite simply a colossal album that gets better with every year that passes. Except for its forgettable instrumental closer, “‘A’ 200,” every song is an absolute monster in its own way, with the kinetic title cut, the irresistible “Might Just Take Your Life” and the massive burn-the-house-down blues catharsis of “Mistreated” as the particular standouts.
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People who added this item 174 Average listal rating (120 ratings) 8.4 IMDB Rating 0
Machine Head - Deep Purple
2. 'Machine Head' (1972)
'Machine Head' is Deep Purple’s most essential and influential album, hands down, what with timeless classics like the unbeatable show opener “Highway Star,” maybe the band’s best ever pure single in “Never Before,” the irrepressible “Space Truckin’,” and the mother of all riffs in “Smoke on the Water.” But it falls just short of being their best because remaining cuts “Pictures of Home” and “Lazy” fall just shy of spectacular and “Maybe I’m a Leo” is a flat-out disappointment. But it's still a must-own.
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People who added this item 4 Average listal rating (2 ratings) 9.5 IMDB Rating 0
Deep Purple In Rock - Deep Purple
1. 'Deep Purple In Rock' (1970)
Just like Mount Rushmore, only with five, instead of four, legendary faces, 'In Rock' is Deep Purple’s most important album. Their wholesale reinvention as hard rock doyens and heavy metal godfathers, it saved the group’s career from its late ‘60s doldrums with an amazing set of songs, including blistering standards like “Speed King,” “Bloodsucker,” “Into the Fire," the driving “Flight of the Rat,” and the epic peaks and valleys of “Child in Time.” Giving it the nod over any one of Deep Purple’s four or five greatest albums is obviously subject to debate, but we feel it edges them all!
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(Index) STUDIO ALBUMS RANKED (8 lists)
list by MusicLover
Published 2 weeks, 3 days ago



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