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Review of The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers   

A new power is rising.

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''Where is the horse and the rider? Where is the horn that was blowing? They have passed like rain on the mountain, like wind in the meadow. The days have gone down in the West behind the hills into shadow. How did it come to this?''

Frodo and Sam continue on to Mordor in their mission to destroy the One Ring. Whilst their former companions make new allies and launch an assault on Isengard.

Christopher Lee: Saruman the White

Brad Dourif: Grima Wormtongue

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is like Fellowship a triumph that any Tolkien fan, adventure/fantasy or war enthusiast should see.
J.R.R. Tolkien's novel The Two Towers with the help of Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Stephen Sinclair and Peter Jackson's screenplay he brings the story to life upon the screen.
Director Peter Jackson admitted The Two Towers was the hardest part of the trilogy to achieve, at least in terms of narrative structure since, unlike The Fellowship of the Ring, it has no proper beginning and no emotionally packed climax. What does it have? It has the psychotic split personality Smeagol/Gollum brought to life with stunning visual effects, it has epic battles at Helm's Deep and three plot threads all happening simultaneously.



The Two Towers picks up exactly from where its predecessor ended: the Fellowship is broken into three separate groups, all with their own problems:
Frodo (Elijah Wood) and Sam (Sean Astin) continue their journey to Mordor in order to destroy the One Ring, and find an unexpected guide in that item's previous owner, vicious creature Gollum (Andy Serkis); Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Legolas (Orlando Bloom) and Gimli (John Rhys-Davies) reunite with the reborn Gandalf (Ian Mckellen) to save the dying kingdom of Rohan from Saruman's (Christopher Lee) evil clutch; Merry (Dominic Monaghan) and Pippin (Billy Boyd) have a close encounter with the Ents, ancient creatures which have unfinished business with a certain bad wizard...
New cast members also join the fray and Middle Earth saga; The talented Brad Dourif, Bernard Hill, Miranda Otto, Karl Urban, and David Wenham.

''A new power is rising. Its victory is at hand. This night the land will be stained with the blood of Rohan. March to Helm's Deep. Leave none alive. To war!''

The Two Towers does not follow the middle book in Tolkien's epic trilogy as closely as some would imagine, and does indeed take a few liberties here and there, but overall this is an epic, fantastical adaptation and, let's face it, probably among the greatest sequels in film history. Jackson once again successfully creates a believable yet fanciful vision of Middle Earth; His special effects, while not quite as seamless and earthy as in Fellowship are nonetheless impressive, and there's great magic in the cinematography, set design and music. The acting is also a level of magnitude above that seen in any Oscar contending picture this decade. Each actor and actress is able to make his or her character unique and believable within the terms of the story. This film probably comes the closest of any to resembling a perfect marriage between art, award winning drama and blockbuster entertainment.

Overall, The Two Towers brings new favourite characters from the books to life. Grima Wormtongue played by Brad Dourif, equals a parody of slimy villainy along with Saruman. Treebeard, leader of the Ents of the forest, voiced by John Rhys-Davies also makes another lovable, memorable character. I would say the most impressive newly studied and realized character would be Gollum. Andy Serkis lends his voice, his body to the creation of this layered creature. In fact the effects and artful poise owe alot to the man Serkis whom effortlessly helps bring the creature Gollum whom was once Smeagol to life.
The Two Towers is the middle part of one of the greatest trilogies ever realized in film. It was the hardest film to adapt to screen but Peter Jackson takes his best shot and effortlessly succeeds in again making an emotional and turbulent story packed with vibrant characters, he succeeds in bringing life to J.R.R. Tolkien's story upon film. Won 2 Oscars for Sound Editing and Visual Effects.

A Masterpiece.

''The battle of Helm's Deep is over; the battle for Middle Earth is about to begin.''

10/10
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Added by AgentLexi 3 years ago
on 4 May 2010 15:11

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Posted: 3 years, 11 months ago at May 4 17:10
Nice work, my friend :D

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