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Added by ladybellatrix on 12 Apr 2012 05:01
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Greatest Film Tearjerking Moments M - P

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People who added this item 1624 Average listal rating (962 ratings) 7 IMDB Rating 7.4
The excruciating scenes in which abrasive comedian and practical joker Andy Kaufman (Jim Carrey) (and his lounge-singer alter ego Tony Clifton) tried to cure his lung cancer with various quackery and miracle remedies, such as New Age crystals, Philippine Islands faith healers, etc.; and the poignant final scene - a costumed recreation of Tony Clifton's comeback concert appearance a year after Kaufman's death, in which Kaufman and writing partner and friend Bob Zmuda's (Paul Giamatti) "Tony Clifton" character defiantly sang together: "I Will Survive" as Zmuda also looked on! - while music group R.E.M.'s tribute to Kaufman's "Man on the Moon" played.
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The opening sequence of a radio distress call by squadron leader Peter D. Carter (David Niven) delivered within a burning British RAF bomber plane -- as he fell in love with American WAC radio operator June (Kim Hunter); the trial in Heaven (in B/W) of Carter to prove whether he should remain on Earth or not; the shot of one of June's tears caught on the petals of a rose, which was used as evidence by Dr. Reeves (Roger Livesey)-- and the profoundly romantic, tearjerking sentimental ending in which the two lovers were asked in Heaven to prove their love for one another, and June proved it by taking Carter's place - when the stairs started to move upward, separating the lovers, June and Carter stared at each other, and with a jolt, and in a close-up on the tearful June, the stairs stopped - she ran down the stairs to embrace Carter and Dr. Reeves informed the assembly watching that although the law may be the strongest thing in the universe, "on Earth, nothing is stronger than love" - the film ended with the lovers embracing after being granted a long life by the court.
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People who added this item 979 Average listal rating (577 ratings) 7.8 IMDB Rating 7.9
The scene of Joe Buck (Jon Voight) wiping off the sweaty head of ailing friend Enrico "Ratso" Rizzo (Dustin Hoffman) in a stairway before attending an underground film-making party in Greenwich Village, and the poignant Florida-bound trip when "Ratso" Rizzo expired in the back of the bus quietly as close friend (lover?) Joe speculated about their future together: ("When we get to Miami, what we'll do is get some sort of job, you know. 'Cause hell, I ain't no kind of hustler. I mean, there must be an easier way of makin' a living than that. Some sort of outdoors work") before realizing he'd passed away, and Joe's tearful embrace of Ratso as the bus driver (Al Stetson) told the other passengers: ("Okay, folks, everything's all right. Nothing to worry about...Okay folks, nothin' to worry about. Just a little illness. We'll be in Miami in just a few minutes.")
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People who added this item 2012 Average listal rating (1145 ratings) 7.5 IMDB Rating 7.6
The moving final scene of the film, using the framing device in which San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk (Sean Penn) recorded his will into a cassette tape recorder in 1977, even predicting his own assassination, but still striving for hope: ("...I ask this, that If there be an assassination, I would want five, ten, a hundred, a thousand to rise. If a bullet should enter my brain, let it destroy every closet door. I ask for the movement to continue because it's not about personal gain, it's not about ego and it's not about power. It's about the 'us's' out there. Not just the gays, but the blacks and the Asians and the seniors and the disabled. The 'us's'. Without hope, the 'us's' give up. And I know you can't live on hope alone. But without hope, life is not worth living. So you, and you, and you, you got to give them hope. You got to give them hope") - and after his 1978 assassination at the age of 48 by crazed fellow politician Dan White (Josh Brolin), a flashback to his prophetic words when he was celebrating his 40th birthday ("Forty years old, and I haven't done a thing I'm proud of...I'll never make it to 50") -- and the candlelight vigil and march that stretched for miles in tribute and honor to the brave, martyred gay activist (and slain Mayor George Moscone (Victor Garber)) by 30,000 supporters who marched from the Castro district to City Hall
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People who added this item 3825 Average listal rating (2430 ratings) 7.6 IMDB Rating 8.1
In the dark, emotionally-wrenching and controversial ending of the melodramatic sports film, mentor/manager Frankie Dunn (Clint Eastwood) finally honored paraplegic boxer Maggie Fitzgerald's (Hilary Swank) request one evening.

The irascible but caring trainer Frankie entered her room and told her the meaning of the Gaelic phrase on her green fight robe: "Mo chuisle" ("Pulse of my heart" or "My pulse") that cheering crowds had chanted.

After kissing her and saying goodbye (a tear ran down her cheek), he turned off her life-support machine, unhooked her breathing tube and injected her with an adrenaline overdose, to cause her instant death.

Afterwards, Frankie's silhouette exited from the hospital - and from boxing altogether.
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The climactic, emotional scene of the idealist Senator Jefferson Smith's (James Stewart) exhausting filibuster (almost 24 hours) in the US Senate against the graft of distinguished Senator Joseph Paine (Claude Rains), with his exposition on moral integrity, American democracy, and 'lost causes' before collapsing to the Senate floor: "Great principles don't get lost once they come to light. They're right here. You just have to see them again...You think I'm licked. You all think I'm licked. Well, I'm not licked. And I'm going to stay right here and fight for this lost cause, even if this room gets filled with lies like these; and the Taylors and all their armies come marching into this place. Somebody will listen to me"; and the conclusion in which conscience-stricken and remorseful Senator Paine re-entered the Senate floor and admitted that everything Smith said was true - exonerating and vindicating him and the American political system: "Every word that boy said is the truth! Every word about Taylor and me and graft and the rotten political corruption of our state. Every word of it is true. I'm not fit for office! I'm not fit for any place of honor or trust. Expel me!" - resulting in a mad eruption of support on the floor of the Senate and in the gallery.
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People who added this item 1791 Average listal rating (1118 ratings) 8.4 IMDB Rating 8.5
The final unforgettable image of the Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) arm in arm with the homeless Gamin (Paulette Goddard) silhouetted together and walking into the sunrise to face a new day, at the film's conclusion.
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Ria Verma's (Shefali Shetty) angry and malignant revelation that family friend Tej Puri (Rajat Kapoor) sexually molested her as a girl after realizing that he was repeating those offenses with 10 year-old cousin Aliya Verma (Kemaya Kidwai); and Ria's uncle and adoptive father (and father of the bride in the wedding) Lalit Verma's (Naseeruddin Shah) tearful realization in bed with his wife Pimmi (Lillete Dubey) that Ria was not lying - and that he must break with tradition by confronting Tej and telling him and his wife to never return again.
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People who added this item 4386 Average listal rating (2800 ratings) 7.3 IMDB Rating 7.6
The ending in which Moulin Rouge's star and beautiful courtesan Satine (Nicole Kidman) died of tuberculosis in the arms of penniless writer/lover Christian (Ewan McGregor).
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People who added this item 225 Average listal rating (145 ratings) 6.4 IMDB Rating 7
The touching relationship in 1940's Mississippi between frail, young boy Willie (Frankie Muniz) and his faithful Jack Russell terrier Skip (played by Frasier TV sitcom dog Moose); the scene in which Willie slapped Skip for running onto the baseball field to comfort him; and the scene in which Willie's older best friend and ex-star high school athlete Dink (Luke Wilson) returned home after fighting in WWII - now a broken man who never left his home: ("It isn't the dying that's scary. It's the killing"); also the scene in which Willie saw a deer die before his eyes; and Skip's sad death from old age.
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The sad scene in which drunken, swashbuckling movie star Alan Swann (Peter O'Toole), hidden in his limo, watches his estranged daughter Tess (Cady McClain) ride a bicycle in Connecticut - after Swann has driven away, his daughter looks on, knowing he'd been watching; and the sentimental ending after Swann had saved the day on live TV - his last great moment - as young comic writer Benjy Stone (Mark-Linn Baker) narrated about it: ("The way you see him here, like this...this is the way I like to remember him. I think if you had asked Alan Swann what was the single most gratifying moment in his life, he might have said this one, right here. The next day, I drove up to Connecticut with him and Alfi (Tony DiBenedetto). THIS time, he knocked on the door, and when he and Tess saw each other, it was like they'd never been apart. Like Alfi says: 'With Swann, you forgive a lot, you know?' I know.")
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People who added this item 1991 Average listal rating (1214 ratings) 6.7 IMDB Rating 6.8
The touching, poignant first kiss between pre-teens: precocious 11 year old hypochondriac Vada Sultenfuss (Anna Chlumsky) and allergy-ridden, geeky Thomas J. Sennett (Macauley Culkin) discussed the facts of life, before coming around to their first kiss; Vada assertively asked: "Have you ever kissed anyone?" with his response: "Like they do on TV?" and then she suggested: "Maybe we should, just to see what's the big deal"; when he said: "But I don't know how," she proposed that they practice kissing their arms, and then close their eyes for the real thing, on the count of three -- afterwards, she demanded that he say something because it was "too quiet", and being agitated, he began to recite a mangled version of the Pledge of Allegance ("On political agents to the flag of the United States of America...") (Note: the scene won MTV's "Best Kiss" movie award); and Thomas' funeral scene after he died from a bee sting with Vada first coming down the stairs to listen to the minister from afar, and then her tearful, mournful breakdown at Thomas' open coffin: "Wanna go tree climbing, Thomas J.? His face hurts. And where is his glasses? He can't see without his glasses. Put his glasses on! Put on his glasses! He was gonna be an acrobat...!"; when she was restrained, she went running out of the ceremony; and also the final scene of Vada reading a poem to her summer writing class about a weeping willow tree - their favorite spot: "Weeping willow with your tears running down. Why do you always weep and frown? Is it because he left you one day? Is it because he could not stay? On your branches he would swing. Do you long for the happiness that day would bring? He found shelter in your shade. You thought his laughter would never fade. Weeping willow, stop your tears. There is something to calm your fears. You think death has ripped you forever apart. But I know he'll always be in your heart"; the film then ended with the playing of the Temptations' "My Girl" on the soundtrack
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People who added this item 2864 Average listal rating (1789 ratings) 7.7 IMDB Rating 8
The scene of grieving ex-con and corner grocery-store owner Jimmy Markum (Oscar-winning Best Actor Sean Penn) learning of the discovery of a body in the local park - belonging to his 19 year-old daughter Katie (Emmy Rossum) and screaming out to Massachusetts State homicide detective Sean Devine (Kevin Bacon) as he was restrained: "Sean, is that my daughter in there?!"; also the powerfully-acted scene of Jimmy on the back porch with Dave struggling to grieve and let go with his tears over the hurtful, wrenching loss of Katie (Jimmy: "There's one thing you could say about Katie even when she was little. That girl was neat... And it's really starting to piss me off, Dave, because I can't cry for her. My own little daughter, and I can't even cry for her." Dave: "Jimmy. You're crying now." Jimmy: "Yeah, damn. I just want to hug her one more time. She was 19 f--king years old"); also the scene of an emotionally-scarred Dave with his untrusting, fragile, and panicky wife Celeste (Marcia Gay Harden) recalling his 4-day abuse and feeling like an undead vampire ("Maybe one day you wake up and you forget what it's like to be human...Dave's dead. I don't know who came out of that cellar, but it sure as shit wasn't Dave...It's like vampires. Once it's in you, it stays..."), and the scene of suspected teen Brendan Harris (Thomas Guiry), Katie's boyfriend, who spoke poignantly about his lost love after her death: "I'm never gonna feel that again. It doesn't happen twice"
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People who added this item 392 Average listal rating (200 ratings) 7.5 IMDB Rating 7.8
The concluding tragic and shocking sequence at a country music festival/political rally at Nashville's Parthenon in which popular country singer Barbara Jean (Ronee Blakley) had just finished performing "My Idaho Home" and then was assassinated - and quickly replaced with unknown performer Albuquerque (Barbara Harris) who calmed the crowd with "It Don't Worry Me".
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The late scene in which the Native American ("natural") princess Pocahontas (Q'orianka Kilcher) was reunited in an England garden with her first love after a few years: regretful Jamestown explorer Captain John Smith (Colin Farrell), asking: "Did you find your Indies, John? You shall" and his response: "I may have sailed past them" - and then the following scene in which she fully expressed her devoted love with a kiss to loyal farmer-husband John Rolfe (Christian Bale) ("My husband"), with a score enhanced by Mozart's concerto and a recurring prelude from Wagner's Das Rheingold.
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People who added this item 319 Average listal rating (175 ratings) 6.7 IMDB Rating 7.1
The scene in which a resigning and sobbing President Nixon (Anthony Hopkins) prayed with Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (Paul Sorvino) and his poignant conversation to a portrait of Kennedy: ("When they look at you, they see what they want to be. When they look at me, they see what they ARE..."), before delivering his TV resignation speech ("My mother was a saint...").
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People who added this item 3499 Average listal rating (2127 ratings) 7.4 IMDB Rating 7.9
A romantic love story viewed over many years was the subject of this intense tearjerker. Young, privileged and pretty Southern debutante Allie Hamilton (Rachel McAdams) shared a passionate rain-soaked kiss after an idyllic afternoon rowboating through a spectacular duck-filled setting with earthy mill worker Noah Calhoun (Ryan Gosling), as she learned for the first time that he had written her 365 love letters (one each day for a year) - although her domineering mother had intercepted them and disapproved of his 'low-class' status. Noah professed his love on the dock: "It wasn't over. It still isn't over!". Later, another emotional scene was the moment that Allie finally made a choice between Noah and her parent-approved fiancee Lon Hammond, Jr. (James Marsden) - and drove to Noah's fixed-up mansion to move in and be with him. In the final scenes, it was revealed that nursing home patient Allie Hamilton/Calhoun (Gena Rowlands) had severe Alzheimer's Disease and could only remember the story of their love for a few minutes. She and frail heart patient Noah or "Duke" Calhoun (James Garner) had met and fallen in love when in their teens - in old age, Noah repeatedly rekindled their love by re-reading from her old faded notebook diary (written by Allie as a present to Noah years earlier, with the handwritten dedication: "Read this to me, and I'll come back to you"). After one of the readings telling of their love for each other, Allie briefly remembered their love during a special candlelight dinner in the nursing home when they shared a dance together - Allie requested: "Do you think I can be her tonight?" - but then she rapidly 'forgot' and panicked. In the final scene in the rest home, she remembered him as they held hands in her bedroom, where he promised he would always be there and never leave her. She asked him: "Do you think that our love can create miracles?" He replied: "Yes, I do. That's what brings you back to me each time." She asked a second question. "Do you think our love can take us away together?" He responded: "I think our love can do anything we want it to." They fell asleep in the same bed, and passed away together.
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Before a tragic and tear-jerking mercy killing in the film's final scene, George promised his friend that they would finally have a place of their own - he distracted him with the retelling of their dream of a ranch of their own, before shooting him in the back of the head:

George: We're gonna get a little place...We're gonna have a cow, and some pigs, and we're gonna have, maybe-maybe, a chicken. Down in the flat, we'll have a little field of...
Lennie: Field of alfalfa for the rabbits.
George: ...for the rabbits.
Lennie: And I get to tend the rabbits...

Lennie's last pitiful words were about his oft-repeated task.
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The tough training of drill instructor Sgt. Emil Foley (Louis Gossett, Jr.) - notably of naval candidate trainee Zack Mayo (Richard Gere) who was powerfully determined to not quit his recruit training: (Foley: "I want your DOR...All right, then you can forget it! You're out!" Mayo: "I ain't gonna quit...Don't you do it! Don't you - I got nowhere else to go! I got nowhere else to g... I ain't got nothin' else. I got nothin' else"); the tragic scene of Mayo's buddy Sid Worley (David Keith) committing suicide by hanging (in the nude in a motel bathroom) after a failed relationship with Paula Pokrifki's (Debra Winger) manipulative work friend Lynette Pomeroy (Lisa Blount); and the rousing romantic finale (often considered cheesy) in which Zack kissed and then carried a surprised paper factory worker/girlfriend Paula away from her job in his arms: (Lynette: "Way to go, Paula! Way to go!") - to the sounds of "Up Where We Belong" during the credits.
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People who added this item 300 Average listal rating (183 ratings) 7.3 IMDB Rating 7.7
Estranged daughter Chelsea Thayer's (Jane Fonda) complaint about dealing with her father Norman (76 year-old Henry Fonda): "I act like a big person everywhere else. I'm in charge of Los Angeles, and I come here, I feel like a little fat girl"; the teary confrontation and ultimate reconciliation between Norman and daughter Chelsea at the dock (Chelsea: "It just seems that you and me have been mad at each other for so long..." Norman: "I didn't think we were mad; I thought we just didn't like each other" - ending with "I want to be your friend"), culminating with Chelsea eagerly doing "a real g-ddamned back-flip" off the diving board for an appreciative Norman; and the final scene in which Ethel (Katharine Hepburn) prayed when aging husband Norman collapsed due to angina: ("Dear God, don't take him now. You don't want him. He's just an old poop"), with Ethel's beaming, reassuring line to Norman: "You are my knight in shining armor!", and the final line by Norman, using slang he had learned from 13 year-old Billy (Doug McKeon): ''Wanna dance or would you rather just suck face?''
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People who added this item 598 Average listal rating (396 ratings) 6.5 IMDB Rating 6.8
The famous ending in which just-married James Bond (George Lazenby) lost his new wife Tracy Di Vicenzo (Diane Rigg), when Blofeld's (Telly Savalas) henchwoman Irma Bunt (Ilse Steppat) strafed their limousine with machine-gun fire - missing Bond but killing Tracy - this heart-breaking scene was punctuated by Louis Armstrong singing: "We Have All the Time In the World."
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Dockworker and ex-boxer Terry Malloy's (Marlon Brando) regretful speech to his brother Charley (Rod Steiger) in the back seat of a taxi-cab: ("It wasn't him, Charley! It was you. You remember that night in the Garden, you came down to my dressing room and said: 'Kid, this ain't your night. We're going for the price on Wilson.' You remember that? 'This ain't your night!' My night! I coulda taken Wilson apart! So what happens? He gets the title shot outdoors in the ball park - and whadda I get? A one-way ticket to Palookaville....You was my brother, Charley. You shoulda looked out for me a little bit. You shoulda taken care of me - just a little bit - so I wouldn't have to take them dives for the short-end money....You don't understand! I coulda had class. I coulda been a contender. I coulda been somebody, instead of a bum, which is what I am. Let's face it (pause) ...... It was you, Charley.")
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People who added this item 246 Average listal rating (158 ratings) 7.7 IMDB Rating 7.9
The realistic, brutal, difficult-to-watch domestic abuse scene in which Jake Heke (Temuera Morrison) savagely beat (he punched her repeatedly, slammed her against the living room wall and mirror, kicked her, and threw her into the bedroom) and then raped (off-screen) his battered wife Beth (Rena Owen), as the four children, including 13 year-old writer Grace Heke (Mamaengaroa Kerr-Bell), huddled and cowered together in a bunk bed listening to the violence; and Grace's own rape by Jake's best friend "Uncle" Bully (Cliff Curtis) in her own bedroom (he excused himself by blaming her for turning him on) in the middle of the night - and the next morning her attempt to scrub herself clean in a bathtub, and her subsequent suicide, in Lee Tamahori's searing melodrama about domestic abuse and alcoholism set in the Maori community in New Zealand.
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The moving scene of suicidal, guilt-ridden high-school student Conrad "Con" Jarrett (Timothy Hutton) admitting his feelings about his older brother's accidental drowning (during a sailing trip) in his late-night therapy session with the psychiatrist Dr. Berger (Judd Hirsch): ("What was the one thing wrong you did?", "I hung on") and the therapist's reassurance: "I am your friend, Count on it", and the climactic scene in which Conrad's compassionate and warm-hearted father Calvin (Donald Sutherland) admits his loss of love for his cold and icy wife Beth (Mary Tyler Moore): ("...I don't know who you are. I don't know what we've been playing at. So I was crying. Because I don't know if I love you any more. And I don't know what I'm going to do without that") and the closing scene before the credits in which Calvin reconnects with his son - with a hug.
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People who added this item 512 Average listal rating (307 ratings) 6.4 IMDB Rating 7
The flashback memory in which emotionally-scarred Gil Buckman (Steve Martin) remembered his cold and distant 64 year-old father Frank (Jason Robards) abandoning him at a baseball game on his birthday, leaving the usher to watch over him; the reconciliation scene between Gil and Frank, when Frank gave him heartfelt advice: "There are no guarantees in being a parent. You cannot guarantee that you'll raise your children into perfect adults. You just go out there and do the best for your children"; and the tearjerking exchange between Frank and Cool (Alex Burrall) - the 8 year-old illegitimate black son of Frank's irresponsible "black sheep" gambling son Larry (Tom Hulce) after the child was abandoned: (Cool: "Is Daddy coming back?", Frank: "No")
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The poignant bravura peep-show scene of an 8 minute long conversation (through microphones) with Travis' (Harry Dean Stanton) confession to estranged wife Jane (Nastassja Kinski): ("I knew these people. These two people. They were in love with each other. The girl was very young, about 17 or 18, I guess. And the guy was quite a bit older. He was kind of raggedy and wild. And she was very beautiful, you know. And together they turned everything into a kind of adventure. And she liked that....") - and the moment that Travis turned his booth light off so that she could see him, and the overlapping or melting together of their images and then their separation; also the heartbreaking conclusion - when Travis returned his 8 year-old son Hunter (Hunter Carson) to Jane and then drove away
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It told of the agonizing, unsparing crucifixion death of "Jesus Nazareth/ King of the Jews" (James Caviezel) on the cross. He was first severely beaten, forced to carry part-way his own wooden cross to the hillside of Golgotha outside Jerusalem, and then was nailed to the cross to suffer and die.
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People who added this item 1139 Average listal rating (685 ratings) 8.4 IMDB Rating 8.4
The final tavern scene in which a captured blonde German girl (Susanne Christian in the credits), timid and with tears running down her cheeks, sang a German ballad for French soldiers - and the look on their faces as they first humiliated her, and then softened, listened empathically and understood her pain - the song evoked memories of their youth, their homes, and their loves in a world they might never see again; the scene ended with Commander Dax (Kirk Douglas) giving his weary men the 'short' rest that they were promised: "Well, give the men a few minutes more, Sergeant," as the sound of drums and military music playing the "Soldier Boy" song rose in volume and drowned out the sound of the folk song.
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People who added this item 1525 Average listal rating (870 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 8.1
The scene set during the 1979 Islamic revolution (against the US-backed Shah) in which 11 year-old Marjane (or Marji) Satrapi (voice of Chiara Mastroianni) visited her imprisoned, soon-to-be executed Uncle Anouche (voice of Fran├žois Jerosme/Iggy Pop), an Iranian political prisoner, when he gave her a second swan made of hardened bread crumbs, calling it "the uncle" of the first swan he gave her from his first time in jail; and the scene of Marjane lying in bed with both swans, cursing God and imagining the two swans swimming out to sea; also, the demise of one of Marjane's friends, Nima, who tried to escape a raid on a forbidden drinking party and fell to his death trying to leap from one rooftop to another; and the heartbreaking scene in which political dissident Marjane left repressive Iran forever to live in Europe, and saw her Grandmother (voice of Danielle Darrieux/Gena Rowlands) for the last time: ("That was the last time I saw my grandmother. She passed away shortly afterwards. Freedom always has a price"), and the final voice-over by young Marjane of her memories about how her Grandmother kept smelling fresh: (Marjane: "Grandma, you always smell so nice. How do you do it?" Grandmother: "Well, I'll tell you. Every morning, I pick fresh jasmine flowers, and when I get dressed I put them into my brassiere. That way, I smell nice all day"), followed by the closing credits featuring falling jasmine flowers (white flowers on a black background), in Marjane Satrapi's dark autobiographical animated film based on her best-selling graphic novels
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People who added this item 2170 Average listal rating (1314 ratings) 7.4 IMDB Rating 7.7
The moving interpretation by dying, AIDS afflicted ex-lawyer Andrew Beckett (Tom Hanks) from Philadelphia, wrongly terminated from his prestigious law firm, to his initially homophobic lawyer Joe Miller (Denzel Washington) about the music in his favorite Maria Callas aria - he spoke over the music and pulled his IV around with him as he accepted his own impending death: ("...The music - it fills with a hope, and it'll change again, listen. 'I bring sorrow to those who love me.' Oh, that single cello! 'It was during this sorrow that Love came to me.' A voice filled with harmony, that said: 'Live still, I am Life! Heaven is in your eyes. Is everything around you just the blood and mud? I am divine. I am Oblivion. I am the god that comes down from the heavens to the Earth and makes of the Earth a Heaven. I am Love! I am Love!'"); also, the hospital scene of Beckett with his long-term male lover Miguel Alvarez (Antonio Banderas) after first bidding farewell to family and friends (Andrew's supportive mother Sarah (Joanne Woodward) whispered: "Goodnight, my angel, my sweet boy"), then alone when he dimmed the lights, told Miguel: "Miguel, I'm ready," and then removed his own oxygen mask; in the final scene during the reception held in the Beckett home following the funeral, mourners watched home movies of Andrew's younger days, to the tune of Neil Young's Philadelphia
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People who added this item 4010 Average listal rating (2351 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 8.5
The upsetting scene in which Polish-Jewish pianist Wladyslaw Szpilman (Adrien Brody) was forced to play the piano for a Nazi under threat of death; the disturbing imagery of piles of corpses strewn on the streets of Warsaw; and the scene in which Szpilman's family was carted off to the concentration camps when the Nazis enacted their "Final Solution", and a ragged, bearded Szpilman wandered through the barren, bombed out streets of Warsaw, and found his piano intact.
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People who added this item 2515 Average listal rating (1539 ratings) 7.7 IMDB Rating 8.1
The startling scene in which the saintly and compassionate Sgt. Elias (Willem Dafoe) staggered out of the jungle after being shot by sociopathic, malevolent and murderous Sgt. Barnes (Tom Berenger) and left for dead in the Vietnamese jungle - his arms outstretched upwards in slow-motion in a sacrificial, crucifixion pose (while Samuel Barber's Adagio For Strings played) as he was repeatedly shot by VC enemy forces - viewed from a chopper overhead.
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