Explore
 Lists  Reviews  Images  Update feed
Categories
MoviesTV ShowsMusicBooksGamesDVDs/Blu-RayPeopleArt & DesignPlacesWeb TV & PodcastsToys & CollectiblesComic Book SeriesBeautyAnimals   View more categories »
Listal logo

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 4 months, 1 week ago on 2 August 2017 01:29

Shitty movie made for shitty people. One of the worst movies I've ever seen. Only God knows why and how this movie is #1 on IMDb Top 250.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 2 years ago on 24 November 2015 02:09

A popular classic 'tolerated' by the critic. In a way, the script is better than the film, because the narration in off by Freeman has great texts, as the one that makes his freedom. Old Whitmore is great.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 3 years, 10 months ago on 25 January 2014 10:34

A very universally likeable film with lovely characters, a very involved story, and stylized in ways that suit my interests.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

My favourite film

Posted : 4 years, 2 months ago on 22 September 2013 03:57

I really love this film, it was a great idea and it’s well acted, a great achievement and better than Forrest Gump for sure

The story (based on a novel) is certainly very interesting about an innocent person who is sent to jail for a murder he didn't do and the escape is very funny He digs a tunnel through the wall which is covered by a poster in his cell

Coupled with a very good story is showcase performances from leads Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman, a great cast for a #1 movie

'The Shawshank Redemption' is just really amazing like 'Downfall', 'The Aviator' or 'Titanic' but better than all three of them, it truly is the best movie ever
and a must-see for anyone and to all the haters: YOU ARE NOTHING!!!


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 4 years, 4 months ago on 17 July 2013 04:48

Darabont's adaptation of a Stephen King novella is a throwback to the kind of serious, literate drama Hollywood used to make... Against this weighs the pleasure of discovering a first-time director with evident respect for the intelligence of his audience, brave enough to let character details accumulate without recourse to the fast-forward button. Darabont plays the long game and wins: this is an engrossing, superbly acted yarn, while the Shawshank itself is a truly formidable mausoleum.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

Get busy living

Posted : 4 years, 5 months ago on 2 July 2013 11:03

I watched this film last night, and I was truly amazed. We think that we are free out here and that prisoners are not. But the longer we put them in there, the more free they become. The world of stone becomes their everything, outside they have nothing . this movie tells not only the story of an escaping prisoner but also what a happens to a humans mind when u isolate it for too long. We feel regret for what happens to them in there despite the crimes they’ve committed. Hope is dangerous for men that are busy dying, but it’s good for men that are busy living. This movie drags you into the world of prisoners and makes you feel all feelings that u can possibly feel.

Bart ten Hagen


0 comments, Reply to this entry

the shawshank redemption

Posted : 4 years, 7 months ago on 16 May 2013 02:03

this is a very good movie. i would consider this a classic. one of morgan freeman's better movies. tim robbins is also good. stephen king went away from his roots as a horror author and wrote this book, which was then adapted to a movie.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 5 years, 2 months ago on 4 October 2012 02:52

The Shawshank Redemption has now become one of the only handful of films that no-one objects to when you rank it number one or somewhere in the top five or ahead of The Godfather. Go ahead, try it. Now, many directors have tackled Stephen King, and while many have had their arrows miss the target, others have hit the bullseye straight; And Frank Darabont is one of the latter, giving us the greatest silver-screen adaptation of a SK story. It is all things positive and the reason why it is such a great film because everyone involved were great. No actor was miscast, no dialogue was off the hook and no scene was pointless. It is so well a-made movie that it is a surprise it was an utter flop when it was released back in 1994. This is what's wrong with our people; too slow in appreciating a genius movie like Shawshank and a genius director like Darabont. The pace of the film was perfect. To me it felt like akin to talking a tour around your best friend's home, and then sitting back and witnessing the day-to-day life of his family, with your best friend being your personal narrator, bringing you the ins and outs and ups and downs of everything. Shawshank Redemption falls under the category which I've labeled it as unparalleled cinema which also includes films like Ben-Hur, Godfather, Nosferatu and the like. Also, it has my vote for the National Film Registry, which after all, is quite a big honor for the movie and everyone involved in it.

From the performances, everyone remembers Morgan Freeman as Ellis Boyd 'Red' Redding, who is now considered by many to be the greatest black character in a film. Even though he was active for some time, it was this film that propelled Freeman to stardom and to an iconic status as we know him today. His rich narrative voice made him a favourite among directors, commercials and Oscar ceremonies. And who can blame them? Joining him by his side is Tim Robbins as Andy Dufrense, the main hero. Some say he was quite detached in his role but I say different. He had a mature and sensible aura to him that gave his character a unique understanding. Oh, and also his smile, don't forget that. Robbins was very believable in his character and I consider it to be his best role to date, tied alongside with Mystic River. Equalling them both was James Whitmore as Brooks, hands down the best performance from the film. I've always enjoyed his roles and this is one of his top 3 best ever. His nine-minute narration sequence is not only heart-breaking on a realistic level, but damn well acted and narrated. In all respects, the single most greatest narration sequence ever in a film. From the villains, Bob Gunton as the corrupt Warden Norton was simply the tops. Strictly professional and none of the clicking tongue bullshit. A performance like this is rarely seen in other movies. Joining him is William Sadler as Capt. Heywood, the corrupt's corrupt. Another brilliant performance, although not to the level of the above mentioned, but still brilliant.

In conclusion, The Shawshank Redemption is a rare film. A once-in-every-three-decades-film. It commands your attention and makes you cry unashamedly, wince in pain and howl with happiness. Yes sir, this film will make you squeal just like Ned Beatty did in Deliverance but it will still make you feel like a mountain of a man by the end.

9.5/10


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 5 years, 8 months ago on 19 March 2012 02:16

With a legion of titles like Pet Sematary, Firewalker, Sleepwalkers, Maximum Overdrive, and Children of the Corn, it's reasonable not to expect much from Stephen King-inspired motion pictures. Adaptations of the prolific author's work typically vary from mildly entertaining to virtually unwatchable. There are a few notable exceptions, however; two of which (Stand by Me, Misery) were crafted by widely-respected director Rob Reiner. While The Shawshank Redemption is not a Reiner movie per se, it is a production of Castle Rock Pictures (Reiner's film company), and ranks among the best filmed versions of any King stories to date. (This statement has not changed since I first wrote it in 1994.)

Spanning the years from 1947 through 1966, The Shawshank Redemption takes the "innocent man in prison" theme and bends it at a different angle. Instead of focusing on crusades for freedom, the movie ventures down a less-traveled road, concentrating on the personal cost of adapting to prison life and how some convicts, once they conform, lose the ability to survive beyond the barbed wire and iron bars. As one of the characters puts it: "These [prison] walls are funny. First you hate them, then you get used to them, then you start to depend on them."

Filmed on location in a disused Ohio prison, The Shawshank Redemption is set in a place of perpetual dreariness. What little color there is, is drab and lifeless (lots of grays and muted greens and blues), and there are times when the film is a shade away from black-and-white (give credit to cinematographer Roger Deakins, a longtime Cohen brothers collaborator). It's ironic, therefore, that the central messages are of hope, redemption, and salvation.

First time feature director Frank Darabont helms a fleet of impressive performances. Tim Robbins, as Andrew Dufresne, plays the wrongly convicted man with quiet dignity. Andy's ire is internal; he doesn't rant about his situation or the corruptness of the system that has imprisoned him. His unwillingness to surrender hope wins him the admiration of some and the contempt of others, and allows the audience to identify with him that much more strongly.

Ellis Boyd Redding (Morgan Freeman), or "Red" as his friends call him, is the self-proclaimed "Sears and Roebuck" of the Shawshank Prison (for a price, he can get just about anything from the outside). His is the narrative voice and, for once, the disembodied words aid, rather than intrude upon, the story. Serving a life sentence for murder, Red is a mixture of cynicism and sincerity - a man with a good soul who has done a vile deed. His friendship with Andy is one of The Shawshank Redemption's highlights.

William Sadler (as a fellow prisoner), Clancy Brown (as a sadistic guard), and Bob Gunton (as the corrupt warden) all give fine supporting performances. Newcomer Gil Bellows, in a small but crucial role (that was originally intended for Brad Pitt), brings the poise of a veteran to his portrayal of Tommy Williams, Andy's protege.

Ultimately, the standout actor is the venerable James Whitmore, doing his finest work in years. Whitmore's Brooks is a brilliantly realized character, and the scenes with him attempting to cope with life outside of Shawshank represents one of the film's most moving - and effective - sequences.

Unfortunately, following a solid two hours of thought-provoking drama, the movie deflates like a punctured balloon during its overlong denouement. The too-predictable final twenty minutes move a little slowly, and writer/director Darabont exposes a distressing need to wrap up everything into a tidy little package.

"Salvation lies within," advises Warden Norton at one point. It is the presentation of this theme that makes The Shawshank Redemption unique. Prison movies often focus on the violence and hopelessness of a life behind bars. While this film includes those elements, it makes them peripheral. The Shawshank Redemption is all about hope and, because of that, watching it is both uplifting and cathartic.


0 comments, Reply to this entry

The Shawshank Redemption review

Posted : 6 years, 2 months ago on 27 September 2011 05:14

This touching and heart warming film is the most perfect celebration of the human spirit I have seen. Andy Dufresne, wrongly convicted of murdering his wife and her lover, finds the strength not only to change himself, but to bring hope to those around him in Shawshank Prison. This inspiring story is interwoven with a soundtrack which invokes every emotion, from haunting and chilling, to stirring and beautiful. When you go to see a movie and it touches you with its poetry, music, and its atmosphere, and leaves you with a sense of victorious satisfaction, it is a triumph. Field of Dreams was the first movie which invoked these emotions in me. Shawshank Redemption is even more powerful for its simplicity. It doesn't pretend to be clean, nor could it be called a family movie. It is brutal and violent at times, horrifying and sickening at others. However the title says it all. Redemption is what this story is all about. And it is not necessarily redemption for the actual crimes you might have committed, but it is redemption for the way you have lived your life. What emerges can only be called a maginificent piece of art. This is what movies were meant to be.


0 comments, Reply to this entry


« Prev12 3 Next »

Insert image

drop image here
(or click)
or enter URL:
 link image?  square?

Insert video

Format block