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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 2 years, 11 months ago on 11 July 2014 04:30

One of the most entertaining movie. Tarantino rocks. I like the music used here. Liked the parts overlapping. In fact the movies last event was screened in the 3rd part's last scene in "The golden Watch". "The Boney Situation" is not just a flashback , maybe defined as s flashback from Future. 4 parts were good. Uma Thurman was nice. any awards?


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 3 years, 2 months ago on 19 April 2014 09:38

What can I say, a cult classic that stands the test of time. So cool it hurts ,everyone in the film is a perfect casting, music score is superb and the one liners are still used today


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 3 years, 5 months ago on 6 January 2014 05:38

Pulp Fiction is my favorite movie out of all the amazing films to come from director Quentin Tarantino. Everything about this film was brillent an amazing cast of over 10+ well known actors. Amazing witty Dialog that has you cracking up a lot most of the conversations that go on in the movie are perfection. The gore and violence a Tarantino staple is toned done a bit from his other movies but what you get is great.

The story is a trip with the plot being jumbled all over the place it makes you peice the movie together and have fun with it. The movie more or less revolves around a big time crime boss Marsellus Wallace(Ving Rhames) and from here we branch off into little story arcs with John Travolta and Samuel L. Jackson they are his hit men, Bruce Willis a guy on the run becuase we he was paid to throw a boxing match but didn't and Marsellus wife Uma Thurman she just wants to have a good time which ends up costing her. All the actors in this film do an amazing job even the actors with small roles they still sold it.

Overall I give it a 10 The movie is masterful and I never get tired of watching it also watching it on blu ray is awesome.


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 3 years, 11 months ago on 17 July 2013 04:38

Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction is a film both monumental and immediately accessible, a 2 1/2-hour picture whose energy never flags. It's the movie equivalent of that rare sort of novel where you find yourself checking to see how many pages are left and hoping there are more, not fewer. The tone is darkly comic in the face of almost operatic violence, though only the most squeamish of viewers will be put off. With Tarantino we get violence as part of an impish vision of life in which anything can happen -- and does... Pulp Fiction is a picture that will stand up to repeat viewings.


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 4 years ago on 3 June 2013 02:41

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Pulp Fiction is a true celebration of cinema. It is the outcome of a mind who saw The Wild Bunch as a child, and one who worked as an usher at a porno theatre when he was sixteen. Quentin Tarantino has never lived for anything but film, and his second feature is well and truly the work of an ex-video rental clerk who spent his time going through the shelves. He can’t help but fill-out his films with reminders of pictures past and present. If cinema pastiche can be qualified as a genre, then Pulp Fiction is the number one entry. It also firmly added the term “Tarantino-esque” to the critical lexicon; though it is a very cine-literature work with allusions as far-reaching as Dashiell Hammett and the French New Wave, it is very much the logical progression of 1992′s Reservoir Dogs.

Both films open in sun-drenched LA coffee shops with shady individuals, although rather than a group of sharply dressed hoods, we find a couple. Thieves “Honey Bunny” (Amanda Plummer) and “Pumpkin” (Tim Roth) are in love and clearly bad news. They are an archetypal Tarantino creation; his scripts for True Romance and Natural Born Killers focused on a similar partnership. The dialogue fires and the seeds are sewn for a labyrinthine narrative of interconnected stories. (Listen carefully in the opening scene, and you’ll hear the distinctive tones of Samuel L. Jackson.) It already seems like a riff on his debut. But rather than tip the waitress and saunter out into the car park to a rocking golden oldie, Honey Bunny and Pumpkin proceed to stick up the joint. Tarantino is honing his auteurist notions as well as playing with our expectations. Following a wave of foul language, the titles kick-in to the sound of Dick Dale’s “Misirlou” and his gift as a filmmaker is immortalised.

Though he has attained his fair share of detractors in the last twenty years, there is little doubt in my mind that Pulp Fiction is a masterpiece. It moves like a dream. Pulp is two-and-a-half hours long but no one ever calls it slow. Dialogue and music power the film, not the plot(s). It’s all there in our introduction to hitmen Vincent Vega (John Travolta) and Jules Winnfield (Jackson). The oft-quoted “Royale with cheese” conversation still works because it informs us about the characters. We know these people before they unload their pistols on the pitiful Brett (an uncredited Frank Whaley). There’s some plot talk, sure, but mostly they’re just Average Joes doing a job. Hitmen are stock roles we’ve seen many times in Hollywood gangster films, but that knowing dialogue gives them an extra dimension. They’re culturally aware, and while you could argue that Quentin’s “natural” scripting is a little larger-than-life, it sounds right coming from Jackson and Travolta. Has anyone ever delivered his verbal sparring better?

Another thing that makes it a stylistic progression is the non-linear narrative. It was there in Reservoir Dogs but Pulp is his definitive use of the form. Like all of his films, there are vignettes or “chapters.” Q.T. has always been quick to point-out that his work shares a kinship with novels, and you can clearly see the ties to hard-boiled literature throughout. His work isn’t composed of flashbacks, as many wrongly call them; these chapters are a way of telling the story so that it makes the biggest possible impact. There’s a lot about Pulp Fiction that is conventional, and the fractured sequencing of events had been done long before it (see Citizen Kane or Rashomon), but no one uses a non-linear structure as well as Tarantino. It embellishes the shopworn Noir elements, and allows the film to be free in the choices it makes and to get as unpredictable as possible. This is a film where the coke-snorting “femme fatale,” Mia Wallace (Uma Thurman), refers to fellow addict Vincent as a square, only for the shape to magically appear on-screen. A film where the characters go to a 50′s-themed restaurant and dance the batusi to land a trophy. A film that uses old-fashioned rear-projection shots in driving scenes just because it can. Pulp Fiction is a Godardian romp and it’s difficult to imagine why some stuffy critics got so hung-up on the bloodshed.

Importantly, for Daily Mail readers at least, Pulp is a violent film. A promise from any of the director’s movies, it seems. But after almost two decades of upping the ante, this classic seems somewhat restrained. Tarantino’s zeal as a craftsman makes every moment hit hard, although some will be surprised at how much is implied on revisits. Brett’s death on the first go-around is composed only of close-ups of Vincent and Jules as they fire their weapons. Or what about the infamous incident with Marvin (Phil LaMarr)? The perpetually unlucky Vincent accidentally blows the poor bastard’s head clean off, but we don’t get a clear shot of the bullet entering his skull, just the Manga-level spray of blood that splatters the car windshield. It’s too over-the-top to be taken seriously. Imagine that scene playing out in the Kill Bill films and you can see how refined Pulp Fiction is and how much further the director has taken his Gonzo style over the intervening years.

Also look at the scene in which Vincent finds the OD’ing Mia on her living room floor. Due to a crafty bit of exposition early on, she has confused Vincent’s “Bava” heroin for cocaine. She’s his boss’s wife and Marsellus Wallace (Ving Rhames) wouldn’t let Vince off the hook for that (we already know what he did to that Samoan for merely touching his wife’s feet). In a shining example of Tarantino’s ability to mix humour with pathos, the terrified hitman speeds her over to his dealer’s for a shot of adrenaline. Lance (a great Eric Stoltz) can only scream and shout with his wife, Jody (Rosanna Arquette), as they argue over who gets to plunge the needle into Mia’s heart. It’s still hilarious, although Q.T. builds the tension like a seasoned pro. Due to the late Sally Menke’s fantastic editing, we think we see the moment of penetration but we don’t. No matter how many times I see it, it still has the desired effect.

Such moments have branded the film as sadistic viewing, but Pulp Fiction is a very redemptive picture that offers hope to these despicable characters. The story following Butch Coolidge (Bruce Willis) is proof that Tarantino wanted to do more than line the film with shock content. On orders from Mr. Wallace, Butch was meant to go down during a fight but actually killed his opponent. When the big man finally catches up with Coolidge, the pair are inadvertently held captive by a crooked cop and a gimp, in what can safely be called a tribute to Deliverance. Butch gains the upper-hand and a chance to escape, but instead of leaving Marsellus to a grim demise, he does the right thing and saves his life. This shot at redemption is also shared by Jules, who, after a bout of “divine intervention,” decides to quit his life as a crime enforcer. Vincent dismisses his conclusion and ultimately pays the price. Who said Tarantino isn’t a moral filmmaker?

What’s left but to comment on the absolutely stellar acting, the peerless scripting, the perfect soundtrack selections, and the sheer cinematic joy in every shot? If you’re like me, you know Pulp Fiction like the back of your gold watch. Simply timeless.



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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 4 years, 5 months ago on 19 January 2013 04:05

Pulp Fiction

//Arriving in the midst of formulaic Hollywood offerings, Pulp Fiction was the perfectly cultish, quirky antidote to such mind-numbing fluff dominating the cinema; refreshing, bold and striking, it spawned many imitators. Despite its heavy prevalence upon dialogue and disjointed web of events sewn together in a non-linear narrative, audiences flocked and remain enthralled by it to this very day. Peppered with great moments eaten up by actors working at the top of their game (Travolta, Willis and Thurman have never been better, and the film created the aura of greatness that currently surrounds Jackson) Pulp Fiction is primarily successful because of its witty writing, pop culture-surfing, gleeful amorality, cult tuneology and hyperkinetic energy, redefining the crime genre for the foreseeable future. Its compendium format draws upon Black Sabbath and twisty-turny crime literature, but also European movies, Amsterdam and Hollywood history. Indeed, Pulp Fiction operates in the hinterland between reality and movie reality. Into a cadre of movie archetypes — the assassin, the mob boss, the gangster's moll, the boxer who throws a fight — Tarantino injects a reality check that is as funny as it is refreshing. Whereas most crime flicks would breeze over the rendezvous between Vincent and Mia, here we actually get to go on the date— polite chit-chat, awkward silences, bad dancing — before it spirals off into a drugged-up disaster. Just as Resevoir Dogs is a heist film where you don't see the heist, Pulp Fiction never shows its main plot points or their resolution, opting instead to present the audience with detailed conversations about food and Deliverance-style rape. Moreover, after Vincent and Jules take back Marsellus' briefcase, rather than cutting to a cop on their trail, we stay with them and revel in their banal banter as they dispose of a corpse (the genius of Keitel's Wolf in this effort is a moot point — how much intelligence does it take to clean a car, then throw a rug over the back seat?)Although it is termed a crime film, its audacious story dynamics and daring array of characters would prove otherwise generally speaking, since the criminal aspect of the film is never drummed into the mind of the viewer; they're too busy being entertained. What makes the film so great is that it wouldn't work in a linearity, in criss-crossing the exposition, Tarantino forges hooks of expectation and curiosity that pay off one by one in satisfying ways with continuous scenes that interconnect a whole nexus of underworld activity. Its killer dialogue is where its cult worship began, but Pulp Fiction is an equally stimulating visual experience; from the eyeful of Jackrabbit Slims to the magical square Mia draws to underline Vincent's geekiness to Andrzej Sekula's glossy, wide angled image-crafting, the look of it is equally as imaginative without ever calling attention to itself, pop art as film. Unfathomably cool and protean, Pulp Fiction is a wondrous masterpiece of post-modern cinema.


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 5 years, 7 months ago on 20 November 2011 06:01

Una película clásica de colección en la cual los personajes son todo lo que era menos pensado que fueran


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 5 years, 9 months ago on 27 September 2011 05:09

Following the success of 1992's Reservoir Dogs, Quentin Tarantino released his finest film to-date, the self-proclaimed masterpiece Pulp Fiction; a film which is arguably the most influential of the last few decades, and one which stands alone as a "to-be" classic. Pulp Fiction remains widely regarded as one of the essentials in modern cinema, which has established itself as a film for the lovers of cinema, as those are the people it gets its greatest amount of admiration from.

Pulp Fiction marked the new-wave, avant-garde cinema, it became recognised for its vigorously exciting flavour and unfathomable cool. Revolving around a deconstructed narrative, composed of three stories, which are all insanely surreal, Pulp Fiction brings you inside a world Quentin Tarantino has successfully crafted through individuality. The film starts with a lavishly entertaining conversation of tension and wit between two robbers, one being Tim Roth and the other being Amanda Plummer, who kick-start the film with furious energy. This scene is then followed by the infamous conversation of Amsterdam and burgers between the justifiable "cool" of Jules (Samuel L. Jackson) and Vincent (John Travolta). From here on in you have entered a world fuelled by greed and missing-morality.

Sure, Pulp Fiction is undoubtedly one of the "coolest" and "hippest" films around, nevertheless it holds much, much more than that. The film stands as a piece which depicts the psychology of normal people who have been thrown into extreme circumstances, meaning their personalities have changed along with their situation. It is a film which is much than amusingly clever on the surface, as in fact Pulp Fiction juggles allegory, such as the "freedom" of Amsterdam being a counterpart for the film's non-conformist, disobedient nature. The film has countless recurring themes, such as redemption, vengeance, spirituality, morality, individual morals, and a person's mannerisms.

Even behind the film's humorous anecdotes there is still a lingering sense of haunting poignancy the film throws upon its viewer. The inviting environments are simply an innovative showcase for a study of one's ethics and the dealing of horrendously problematical situations. The characters are all vigorously layered, with multi-dimensional emotions and spontaneous behaviour. When I say that every actor performs with undeniable perfection, I mean it. From Christopher Walken's cameo as Captain Koons, to Bruce Willis' alpha-male, yet kind-hearted "boxer-thug" performance. Everyone in the film sets themselves a back-drop for their character, letting every character differentiate between one-an-other. Yet, as Harvey Keitel states in the film, "of course you're character, but it doesn't mean you have character".

Dense script-writing, and what might seem like entirely irrelevant dialogue lets Pulp Fiction become its own piece. And rather than being driven by plot, the film is driven by its variety of surreal characters, who all talk in a way which seems so real. Yes, the conversations may not to be the same topic you talk about with another person, but the way in which a conversation branches off to an entirely different topic is something we all do in everyday life. Few films are able to portray dialogue through such a method, which is one of the countless reasons as to why Quentin Tarantino's script is the key instinctive foundation behind the film, since it lays the rules of what is to occur in a latter scene. The script crafts the comedy, as there are no comedic set-pieces in the film, nor is there a comedic narrative. However, the actors' delivery of nerve-biting, ego-driven lines, which brim with humour and emphasised body language, gives the film its distinguished tone of dark comedy.

One of the reasons Pulp Fiction has become so iconic is due to its diversity in film-making, which is comprised of influences from French new-wave cinema, to Asian crime flicks, yet the film is still entirely original. Quentin Tarantino ultimately creates his own sense of "bravo-film-making". The use of tracking-shots, dolly-zooms, variation in lens focus, quick-cut editing, slow-motion sequences, lyrical camera positioning, steadicam tactics and close-up camera shots, the variety Pulp Fiction has is not just held within inside its narrative, but within its technical side too. Then you have the dynamic use of music, which has clearly been hand-picked by Quentin Tarantino himself and suits the film with a simplistic level of ease. The set-pieces are also crafted with scrutinising detail, such as the notorious lair, involving two hillbillies, a gimp and two of the film's protagonists.

Pulp Fiction is, quite simply, a hard-boiled, noir-toned masterpiece of modern cinema, comprised of film-making which deserves to be dissected frame-by-frame. The sheer unadulterated consistency of greatness Pulp Fiction follows means it is a film which should be watched again and again. Yes, all the characters might be "sinners", yet there is no denying that you will be rooting for a certain character(s) by the end of the film, as surely, with characters as diverse as these there must be someone you share the same belief with, right? Devine-intervention is what Pulp Fiction is, a miracle and one which justifies vast acknowledgement. Take for example Jimmy's (Quentin Tarantino) brief conversation on the "gourmet" of coffee, it sums up the magnificence of Pulp Fiction perfectly, not forgetting the addition of "lots of cream, lots of sugar".


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 5 years, 9 months ago on 31 August 2011 12:33

Along with typical elements of the director, Pulp Fiction is a chronologically scrambled collection of stories of crime are linked and extremely intelligent and entertaining. With that story, almost tough of Tarantino, the film makes references to other movies, series in several twists that change the opinion of the public about the supposed hero of the story. Fulled with jokes and dirty and gross terms, the film’s atmosphere reigns over drugs, violence, deception and monologues filled with a great choice especially casting John Travolta, Samuel L Jackson, Uma Thurman, Vin Diesel and others to make the viewer out of real life and replace it by the generic provocations and homages to old films and style change and relying on the ever impressive soundtrack by Tarantino. Sensational! Loved how Tarantino accosted themes that could have had terrible scenes or pretty flat, but his irony is fantastic! I don’t understand why I haven’t seen this movie before, maybe as I am older I can understand such things, guess it’s the right time.


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Pulp Fiction review

Posted : 6 years, 2 months ago on 25 April 2011 02:04

Yep, this is a great one. It all came together, and I never tire of watching it.


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