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Added by xeriminx on 7 Jul 2015 04:51
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Stockings

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In modern usage, stocking specifically refers to the form of hosiery configured as two pieces, one for each leg (except for American and Australian English, where the term can also be a synonym pantyhose). The term hold-ups and thigh highs refers to stockings that stay up by the use of built-in elastic, while the word stockings is the general term or refers to the kind of stockings that need a suspender belt (garter belt, in American English), and are quite distinct from tights or pantyhose (American English).

Other terms used with stockings include:
◾Cuban heel: A stocking with a heel made with folded over and sewn reinforcement.
◾Demi-toe: Stockings which have a reinforced toe with half the coverage on top as on the bottom. This results in a reinforcement that covers only the tip of the toes as opposed to the whole toe. These can be with or without a reinforced heel.
◾Denier: The lower the denier number the sheerer the garment. Stockings knitted with a higher denier tend to be less sheer but more durable.
◾Fishnet: Knitted stockings with a very wide open knit resembling a fish net.
◾Fencenet: Similar to fishnet, but with a much wider pattern. These are sometimes worn over another pair of stockings or pantyhose, such as matte or opaque, with a contrasting colour. Sometimes referred to as whalenets.
◾Full Fashioned: Fully fashioned stockings are knitted flat, the material is then cut and the two sides are then united by a seam up the back. Fully fashioned stockings were the most popular style until the 1960s.
◾Hold-ups (British English) or Stay-ups: Stockings that are held up by sewn-in elasticated bands (quite often a wide lace top band). In the US they are referred to as thigh-highs.
◾Knee-Highs: Stockings that terminate at or just barely below the knee. Also known as half-stockings, trouser socks, or socks.
◾Matte: Stockings which have a dull or non-lustre finish.
◾Mock seam: A false seam sewn into the back of a seamless stocking.
◾Nude heel: Stockings without reinforcement in the heel area.
◾Opaque: Stockings made of yarn which give them a heavier appearance (usually 40 denier or greater).
◾Point heel: in a Fully Fashioned stocking it is a heel in which the reinforced part ends in a triangle shape.
◾RHT: Abbreviation of reinforced heel and toe.
◾Open-toed: Stockings that stop at the base of the toe with a piece that goes between the first and second toes to hold them down. They can be worn with some open-toed shoes, especially to show off pedicured toes.
◾Sandalfoot: Stockings with a nude toe, meaning no heavier yarn in the toe than is in the leg. They are intended to be worn with sandal or open-toe shoes.
◾Seamed: Stockings manufactured in the old Full-Fashioned manner with a seam running up the back of the leg. In the past they were manufactured by cutting the fabric and then sewing it together. Today stockings are generally fully knitted and a fake or mock seam is added up the back for a particular fashion look. Some brands also produce seamed hold-ups.
◾Seamless: Stockings knit in one operation on circular machines (one continuous operation) so that no seaming is required up the back.
◾Sheers: Stockings generally of a 15 to 20 denier.
◾Stocking Feet: Shoeless feet covered by stockings or socks.
◾Suspender belt (British English) or Garter belt (American English): a belt with straps to keep stockings (not hold-ups) on place: usually they have 4 straps, but may have also 6 or 8.
◾Ultra sheer: A fine denier fiber which gives the ultimate in sheerness. Usually 10 denier.
◾Welt: A fabric knitted separately and machine-sewn to the top of a stocking. Knit in a heavier denier yarn and folded double to give strength for supporter fastening.

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