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Added by Jpit on 12 Aug 2014 08:12
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2016

Read: October
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Read: September-October


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People who added this item 65 Average listal rating (32 ratings) 7.9 IMDB Rating 0
The Fall - Albert Camus
Read: July
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People who added this item 459 Average listal rating (207 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
A Clockwork Orange - Anthony Burgess
Read: July
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People who added this item 13 Average listal rating (5 ratings) 6.4 IMDB Rating 0
Imperial Bedrooms - Bret Easton Ellis
Read: June
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People who added this item 12 Average listal rating (5 ratings) 8.6 IMDB Rating 0
Cities of the Red Night: A Novel - William S. Burroughs
Read: June
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Read: June

Nice little summer reading. The short stories vary from kind of bad - like the one story that is just boring, technical jabber about how to bet at horse races, or the one horse-race chapter right after that which is kind of similar, the political talk-one and maybe the one where the cyborg-woman falls randomly in love with the narrator/writer as well - to a few that stood out more - the one that fits narrative the most is probably the one where Bukowski and or the narrator is driven over to a hospital while puking blood and so on, and he stays there as a patient for a little while. That was both entertaining and actually well written as well, and had a good flow overall. There might have been a couple of others that were pretty decent in that way as well. But most of the stories were just okay, readable, fairly reading, or just something I didn't have that big of an opinion of. And most than often, even while being good, they were also thin and hastily written, and very ragged in both the inward and outward style (like they were, or looked, unedited), but all that might have just made part of the charm, and fit with what they were otherwise like. It's not something you can really complain about, when you just think about what you're reading. Either way, I think just by having read Notes from a Dirty Old Man of the short story collections before, (also "Captain is Out...", but that was more of a diary, and the novels, but I remember them being more straightforward and down-to-earth in the storytelling, even while having lots of connections and similar "themes") I knew what I was getting with this one. My Bukowski-phase has come and gone, but you can still read these every once in a while and he is good at that thing he does.
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People who added this item 513 Average listal rating (264 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
Slaughterhouse-Five - Kurt Vonnegut
Read: May
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People who added this item 1 Average listal rating (0 ratings) 0 IMDB Rating 0
A Soldier's Legacy - Heinrich Böll
Read: May

Very early novel by Böll, first published in the eighties, about a soldier who writes a letter about how his brother-in-arms was killed, to a dead man's family member, who lives next to the man who actually killed him. The writing a letter thing is just a gimmicky way of starting the book and telling the story, when you read along it won't feel anything like a letter, but just someone narrating the story, though every now and then there's some bits and pieces that try and remind the reader of it.

Basically the book is about the relationship of the soldier writing the letter and the soldier who died, who is of a higher rank, from the day they meet to the day the other man dies. Simple and straightforward. The characters are some sort of watchmen in some distant island, with the battles being very far away. So a lot of it is about the everyday life of the more boring-side of the war that the narrator and other characters are living out, filled with routines and little sleep and no battles, and some alcohol. Overall the people, like the main character, has it good, but they don't seem to think so themselves. That kind of stuff is kind of fun to read for me and the anti-war angle comes through as well. It's okay when it is more casual, but sometimes it just comes through way too obviously, like in form of a character who is vocally anti-Hitler.

I don't know what Böll tried with it, but there was also a small storyline in the book, where the narrator falls in love with a French barkeeper after only seeing her once, and not a romantic encounter either. The he keeps thinking about her and finally gets to see her again, and he kisses her and the woman sort of quietly rejects him, and it's suppose to be like kind of touching, or something, I guess. Then only a little while after it's found that she is actually seeing his new friend from the army, and I guess that is suppose to be kind of tragic. That whole thing was weak writing.

There was some potential in the character of the other higher ranked German soldier, who is both the killer and colleague of the man who gets killed, and the moments between those two characters were the most fun part of the novel. The whole angle about how they were friends or at least used to be, but with very contradicting behaviors and opinions had fallen apart, was intriguing. But that angle isn't touched much and the character, the man who ends up killing the friend of the narrator, is limited to only a few appearances, and because the story is told by character other than those two and because it's more about the narrator and the guy who get's killed and their friendly friendship filled with thoughtful conversations and the like, rather than about the the guy who gets killed and the guy who kills him and their stormy relationship - which would have been way more interesting - it just couldn't reach its full potential, and ended up feeling underwhelming, especially when you think about how much better it could have been.

The narrator wasn't annoying or too goody two shoes for me to like, but he wasn't that interesting either (by himself maybe, but with the other main characters he became notably duller), and the narrator writing a letter-approach might have done its own to damage the story, lessening the impact and while making it tight and straightforward, making it less meaningful as well.
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People who added this item 205 Average listal rating (94 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 0
The Road - Cormac McCarthy
Read: May
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People who added this item 3 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Paskateoria - Arto Salminen
Read: April-May
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People who added this item 2 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 7 IMDB Rating 0
Irisches Tagebuch - Heinrich Böll
Read: April

A short journal of his trip to Ireland in the 50's by Heinrich Böll, with different types of approaches to the chapters, some interesting variations and very nicely written parts, like the one about a lonely woman living on a hill, which almost played out like a fictional short story of its own, rather than part of someones journal. Very quick read and not that bad, but the whole "everything is so great and beautiful and magnificent in this country, ooh everything is so great and beautiful and super interesting"-type of stuff that often came out of the writing was a big stumbling block for me. Some great observations, obviously, made for some good writing, but it could still be kind of annoying at the same time.
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Manillaköysi - Veijo Meri
Read: April
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People who added this item 1 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 7 IMDB Rating 0
The Dark Arena - Mario Puzo
Read: April
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People who added this item 439 Average listal rating (249 ratings) 8.3 IMDB Rating 0
The Stranger - Albert Camus
Read: April
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People who added this item 18 Average listal rating (10 ratings) 7.8 IMDB Rating 0
The Cat Inside - William S. Burroughs
Read: April
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People who added this item 2 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Interzone - William S. Burroughs
Read: March
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People who added this item 10 Average listal rating (5 ratings) 8.6 IMDB Rating 0
Read: December - January - February

The Brief Interviews-passages were somewhat fun, but very gimmicky and too many in number. Basically the different variations of the same chauvinist male joke. They started feeling like some Wallace's writing experiments after a while, because after a few of those, I kind of went 'yeah, I get what you're doing, move along'. A few of the lone short stories outside of those were very well written and rich (Forever Overhead, The Depressed Person and maybe Signifying Nothing, as well), while some were seriously overwritten and repetitive (On His Deathbed, Adult World (I & II) and Octet). Then there were those which I didn't really think much about either way and at least one that went over my head a bit (Church Not Made with Hands).

It took me a while to read this, because I'm kind of a bad reader and I didn't really have a big reading-feeling anyway these last two months or so.
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2015

Read: December
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People who added this item 3 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Min kamp. Første bok - Karl Ove Knausgård
Read: October-November
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Vanhan merimiehen tarina - Jaakko Yli-Juonikas
Read: September
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People who added this item 3 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 8 IMDB Rating 0
Ei-kuori - Arto Salminen
Read: September
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People who added this item 25 Average listal rating (7 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 0
The Informers - Bret Easton Ellis
Read: August

Some Easton Ellis for a change. It's been a while (4-5 years or something like that).

Back in the day I read Rules of Attraction twice, which in my books is pretty good. It was probably one of my favorite novels and since this reminded me (of the ones I can remember, since I don't remember Less than Zero more than very vaguely, for instance) of it the most from his bibliography, there was some nice homecoming feel. I basically just like Ellis's style and his characters, who are rarely without some major faults and I knew what I was getting somewhat, so I'm not too critical about the aspects that don't work, even though this wasn't without any.

This was basically a short story collection, though the stories are connected by characters and by happening at the same time etc. Every chapter has a different character as the narrator, like somebody who might have been mentioned in some other characters chapter appears at the next chapter as the narrator. The problem is, there is so much name dropping that it's hard to keep track of all the connections. Plus the the characters may just feel a little too similar with each other, and you can't really call the themes varying either. The book is basically about L.A. based rich kids who drive expensive cars, who do drugs and have sex all the time, usually behind each others backs. They're usually empty inside and depressed, of course, and they're more or less unbalanced and peculiar by nature. Plus some of them are actual vampires.

As a short story collection, this suffers from some pretty standard short story issues, like from the fact that some chapter have more in them than some others and the different sides to it/different view points-thing gave a book like Rules of Attraction a lot more flesh. This was bit more of a mess and even though the view points change in this too, there's too many characters for it to work properly. Bret Easton Ellis only published these chapters as this book because he couldn't finish Glamourama in time, so it's somewhat understandable that it isn't his deepest or though out work.
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People who added this item 21 Average listal rating (12 ratings) 8.8 IMDB Rating 0
The Captain is Out to Lunch - Charles Bukowski
Read: August

Bukowski diary from 1991 to 1993. Written in his later years, when he was settled down in a big house with a Jacuzzi and a wife and nine cats. He doesn't seem to be living all that exciting life anymore. Most of it is about how he visits the racetrack even though he kind of hates it there (but it's the only place where he can think of going), about how he's going to die soon and about how hates everybody and everything, except writing with his new computer and listening to classical music (usually when writing). He makes it plain he basically lives for writing and can't think of what he would do if or when he couldn't do that anymore. He talks about how writes more and better than ever before and that may be truth about whatever else he was writing at the same time (the novel Pulp was one of those things, and that was at least different, if not exactly the best had to offer), but not about this. The book is only about hundred and 30 pages and I really couldn't see this as any longer, because even now it didn't have much to say. Not exactly a bad little thing, but not very varying or many-sided either, even in Bukowski's usual scale. I guess it's a problem that it's a diary and an ordered one at that and that Bukowski wasn't the guy who slept in top of trash cans and got in to fights etc. anymore.
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People who added this item 24 Average listal rating (4 ratings) 7.8 IMDB Rating 0
Underworld - Don DeLillo
Read: April-May, July-August
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People who added this item 69 Average listal rating (30 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
Notes of a Dirty Old Man - Charles Bukowski
Read: July
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People who added this item 29 Average listal rating (11 ratings) 7.5 IMDB Rating 0
Queer: A Novel - William S. Burroughs
Read: June
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People who added this item 33 Average listal rating (16 ratings) 8.9 IMDB Rating 0
Johnny Got His Gun - Dalton Trumbo
Read: May-June
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Read: March-April

contains spoilers

Final part of the border trilogy, featuring both John Grady Cole from All The Pretty Horses, now 19 years old, and Billy Parham from The Crossing, now around thirty or so, working together with a load of other folks at a ranch in New Mexico. This seems to generally be the least liked part of the trilogy, perhaps because of how much there is simply stuff with cowboys doing cowboy stuff and "hanging around" and because of how small portion the so-called tragic romance plot with John Grady Cole falling in love with a young Mexican prostitute actually takes up and how underdevelopment it in the end is, even though it's the one main plot outside of all the ranch-work etc. stuff.

There's notably less of all those long philosophic monologues (which I enjoy more or less, even though it's not very plausible that every single person you meet on the road would be capable of providing those from the top of the head) and much more dialogue between the characters, than in the two previous books and an even clearer end of times-feel. Lots of talk about how the army is going to come and take over the lands, with some characters thinking about moving over to somewhere else, old timers talking about old times etc.

I enjoyed this somewhat more than All The Pretty Horses (and The Crossing beats both Horses and this for me), because this was slower/plotless, less conventional and a bit harsher or more realistic. And because John Grady Cole, who is still very bland and uninteresting, way too straight backed quiet guy who is a good worker, all business and uses phrases like "yessir" and "it's allright" in conversations to annoying amounts, is not the one and only main character. Simply put, Billy Parham has grown a lot more between this and his last appearance and has a lot more personality.

But I don't know, I suppose this was kind of underwhelming or underdone. Didn't really slam my head against the wall or anything. The plot which I mentioned, for example, where Cole falls in love with the prostitute, is just kind of weakly written. Just like in Pretty Horses, McCarthy's way of building up a romance is getting two people to meet each other and then in the next chapter they're like both ready to die for each other, throwing cheesy and overly romantic and melodramatic lines back and forth. The only development or build up in it comes when the prostitute tells about how extra extra crappy childhood she had, and then she dies and J G Cole loses his will to live and goes for a suicidal act because of it and everything is like, tragic.

All in all McCarthy handles the descriptions of action, landscapes or long story monologues better than that kind of stuff, even though the climax of the plot, the knife fight, is fairly entertaining and features some interesting dialogue. And then again, there was a lot of scenes featuring the regular, kind of monotone lifestyle of the ranch workers, and that he knows how to write about both in believable and sometimes in interesting manner. "Sometimes", because all that didn't carry the whole thing for me either. I think at some point I kind of wanted everything to move forward a bit. It's not until the last chapter that it starts advancing at full speed. I liked the epilogue. It had an interesting feel, like a kind of... can't get the right word in my mind, like sad or nostalgic or something (and it featured that long rambling story monologue I was talking about, otherwise omitted almost entirely from this).
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People who added this item 152 Average listal rating (57 ratings) 7.3 IMDB Rating 0
Naked Lunch - William S. Burroughs
Read: March
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People who added this item 564 Average listal rating (428 ratings) 7.4 IMDB Rating 0
Lord of the Flies - William Golding
Read: March
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People who added this item 69 Average listal rating (35 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
Dubliners - James Joyce
Read: January
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People who added this item 10 Average listal rating (7 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 0
The Walking Dead: Book Two - Robert Kirkman
Read: December-January
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2014

People who added this item 34 Average listal rating (22 ratings) 8.5 IMDB Rating 0
Batman: Hush - Jeph Loeb
Read: December
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People who added this item 45 Average listal rating (22 ratings) 8.6 IMDB Rating 0
The Walking Dead: Book One - Robert Kirkman
Read: December
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People who added this item 6 Average listal rating (2 ratings) 9.5 IMDB Rating 0
Mao II - Don DeLillo
Read: December
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People who added this item 248 Average listal rating (161 ratings) 8.4 IMDB Rating 0
Batman: The Killing Joke - Alan Moore_III,Brian Bolland
Read: December
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People who added this item 10 Average listal rating (4 ratings) 7.5 IMDB Rating 0
Child of God - Cormac McCarthy
Read: December

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People who added this item 11 Average listal rating (2 ratings) 8.5 IMDB Rating 0
The Body Artist - Don DeLillo
Read: November
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People who added this item 18 Average listal rating (5 ratings) 7.4 IMDB Rating 0
Libra - Don DeLillo
Read: October-November
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People who added this item 2 Average listal rating (1 ratings) 7 IMDB Rating 0
Sotaromaani - Väinö Linna
Read: October
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People who added this item 70 Average listal rating (26 ratings) 8.1 IMDB Rating 0
Tropic of Cancer - Henry Miller
Read: October
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People who added this item 28 Average listal rating (13 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
Musashi - Eiji Yoshikawa
Read: September-October

Some Spoilers.

A fictitious and heavily romanticized account on the life of a real life Ronin Miyamoto Musashi, starting after the battle of Sekigahara and ending about a ten years later or so to the duel with another famous swordsman, Sasaki Kojiro. I almost would wish that the book would have been all about the title character, because as much as I didn't care that he was presented as almost nothing else than good, honorable and a both better at fights and in spiritual and mental levels than most of the people he encounters, he was still almost the only character who seemed to actually go through something during the 1000 pages - not just in the last hundred ones like most of the others. Sasaki Kojiro was given potential and the ending duel between him and Musashi was both a decent scene and a decent solution to the story, but he was still written in as a bit too much like an antagonist and he really wasn't given enough time either way. If you don't what happened in the real life duel between the two persons, it's still not hard to figure out who came on top when thinking about how the story and characters play out.

Apart from these two, there are characters such as Otsu, who is sensitive and chases the main character because she is blindly in love with him. She basically keeps saying she can't live without him and keeps screaming and chasing after him - a guy he barely even knows - until the very end. None of this makes no sense, unless he character is suppose to be insane or something, but in this case as well I blame the writer more than the character. Why the writer has even bothered to make such a character or for what purpose is completely beyond my understanding. At least, Akemi, the other main female character, learned to forget about the Musashi-madness after a while. Then there is Osugi, an old bitter woman who has sworn a blood oath against Musashi and keeps chasing him for a very long time as well. At least she has colorful personality, but with her too it's still a serious case of beating a head against the wall for an unnecessary many pages. Matahachi is the weak son of the old lady Osugi and a friend of Musashi introduced at the very first chapter. Him I liked, because though he is weak and dumb his weaknesses are pretty realistic and human. Then again as the story unfolds, his behavior becomes more and more over the top as it seems he is full of absolutely nothing else but the weaknesses and thus some of his actions make absolutely no sense either. I was still somewhat interested to see how his story played out as he was so neglected in the film trilogy and was pretty glad to see that the writer had heart to make him something else than a pure caricature in the end. I didn't enjoy Takuan the priest entirely, because he is so clearly made as a fan favorite, in a kind of transparent way with the quirky behavior and besides, it's very boring when some character is _always_ right on the money on everything.

But what I mainly would like to say is that even though this is a thousand page long, the result feels not epic, but just plain long. You could have easily cut away both some bigger sub-characters and smaller ones too, a characters who seem to pop up every now and then just because they have been in the story before. If not cut away them entirely, maybe not bring every single one of them around again and again like he did here. It seems he didn't have heart to end storylines and bring up solutions until there was almost nothing left to tell no more and this results to serious of moments that just go on and on and on, when the writer could have just swung an axe to cut some knots and the book would have been 500 pages long and it still would have told all it did in the 1000 pages. One example being a shamed samurai Gion Toji and an old charmer of a woman who escaped together and disappeared from the story, but pops up twice after, when there is really no need for it at either time. Yoshigawa does this with other characters as well a load of times. "Oh you're here, what a coincidence!". This works at times of course. Matahachi and Musashi meeting after many years being perhaps the best example.

Apart from being unfocused, the story is also very cheesy, unbelievable and overly dramatic, especially as far as the romance-angle goes. Some adventurous samurai-stuff is okay, though it's clear that Yoshigawa wanted to make the whole thing just adventurous and simple and things are presented as such. There is no Harakiri or Samurai Rebellion-thing going at any times. Not even Seven Samurai. I was bothered when he calls some hand-to-mouth Ronin's simply as trash, or something like that. Like how about being a bit more understanding and not quite so black and white. Good guys are good guys, bad guys are bad guys etc. You can also see that apart from the main character, all the other swordsmen are illogical, overly jealous, hateful and bitter in comparison. Like how about making the opponent such as Kojiro simply neutral and let that be that.
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People who added this item 30 Average listal rating (13 ratings) 8.2 IMDB Rating 0
Junky (Essential Penguin) - William S. Burroughs
Read: September

Besides some brief words in the prologue about Burroughs' childhood and an one or two-time mention about how he has a wife, this is clearly centered on one substance addict's addiction and his social life around it. This makes it all clearly focused on the subject, though outside the subject matter it might all seem a bit empty and technical. Not much is explained, like nothing at all about what the relationship with his wife actually is and you can't really talk about any great big storylines with the book. There's continuance especially during the beginning half, but it's still mostly episode-like in style. But as far as the subject matter goes, Burroughs knows what he is talking about and manages to both create a both entertaining and even detailed account, and as he is a bit defensive, he manages to give just plain realistic approach on the matter, pointing out the bad sides and whatnot without being over-the-top moralistic about it. I tired to read this like two times a few years back if I remember correctly and at both times stopped reading after about hundred pages, which is a bit weird because I remember finding this even then as pretty entertaining - and the book is only about 150 pages (or at least my version was) all in all besides.
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White Jazz - James Ellroy
Read: September
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The Crossing - Cormac McCarthy
Read: September

Sixteen-year old Billy Parham living in New Mexico captures a she-wolf by himself and decides to take it to her home to the mountains of Mexico. This is usually the plot description given about the novel, though it is just the beginning hundred-and-something pages of it, the first chapter, a prologue almost to the coming-of-age tale where every lesson is learned the hard way, people ride with horses back and forth in dying little towns and wilderness, eat tortillas and beans by the campfire and random one-scene characters go for some long and sometimes cryptic monologues. The beginning still might be the best written part in the book, as it would work very well as a story of its own and the ending of it is a pretty powerful one. Though it works as a starter for everything that is coming as well and doesn't seem too much like it would be from a different novel entirely. After that chapter the style seems somewhat more similar to All The Pretty Horses and in a way these two novels are the same basically, though I enjoyed this more because the solutions are more to my liking, more lyrical or something and there is less plot somehow. Still, when the book ends it seems like there's been one long hell of a journey behind and the life of the main character is still after all only beginning. But nothing is that clearly divided structure-wise, like it was in All The Pretty Horses. The characters John Grady Cole and Billy Parham are a little too similar however. They're the same almost, though that might only be because they both have just too little personality. So the force lies more in everything else, just as in the lessons learned, in the themes and in the action. The characters are perhaps purposely so un-written so that McCarthy has easier time saying what he wants to say. It's really quite obvious that these two characters will meet in Cities of the Plain because the stories in the novels are like a different sides of a same coin, but I'm still skeptical on how well it will work. The feeling over-lying in the novel is more sad and downbeat than dark or rough or gritty. It's like a one long and hard and disappointing journey, but down to earth and believable one at that, more or less.
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People who added this item 39 Average listal rating (19 ratings) 7.6 IMDB Rating 0
White Noise - Don DeLillo
Read: August / September

Jack Gladney lives with his wife Babette and four children spawning from his current marriage as well as from multiple previous ones. He works at a college as a lecturer on Adolf Hitler, who he has created a study of, almost like a life work of his. The first part of the novel, over hundred pages and about, is centered on multiple small scenes on his life with his family and on occasion in his talks with his eccentric colleague Murray, who has created a study as well, on Elvis Presley. All these scenes are made mainly to create the world the novel portrays, with sometimes a lot of information through the dialogues or the main character's own trail of thoughts. The second part, when the biggest one action of the novel comes about, is written in one long chapter, which as a solution works, because it is the one most plot-driven scenario of the entire thing and very essential part. It helps to empathize all that to put it in one single chapter. The third and last part return more to the form of short chapters and different type of scenes, though this time there are a more clear continuing plots and more drama placed between the characters. Also, the effect of the disaster that took place before is shown. The novel starts to underline the themes of fear of dying, fearing the new and staying in a box outside from all the real happenings of the world and trying to find solutions with which to escape from all the issues, rather than having to deal with them. As a novel, I'd say this was a, though clearly satirical and at times slightly over the top, still pretty realistic on it's cynical view on how people live and how they react to certain issues, on their mind sets. But there are times when the novel seems understanding of the characters and the part where Murray and Gladney are talking towards the end of the book about the fear of death and how to deal with it, seemed full of actually relevant points. The dialogues with the family are also pretty realistic, with all the sudden changes in topics and the whole irregularity, or whatever you would call it, of them. DeLillo offered so much information page after page in this, that I would almost have to have take the book in hand and start skimming through the chapters to give a more detailed view of it all. But that's all for the good.
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All the Pretty Horses - Cormac McCarthy
Read: August

I read Blood Meridian earlier this year and I just suppose I preferred the kind of gritty and hard atmosphere of that one to the more light coming of age-tale thing of this one. McCarthy's style of writing is much the same here as well, though because the main character John Grady Cole is actually a character unlike the boy from Blood Meridian who was just someone whose eyes the story was seen through, the story as well is more divided clearly in to certain stages, with the long chapters serving mostly as clear different parts to the novel. While the BM was mainly about the action, even if it slowed down at parts, All the Pretty Horses appears planned out. Characters riding out of Texas, getting to know a person down a road and get in to a tense situation, they find a place where they settle as a sort of rest from the action, their close past finally catches up to them again, then the final long chapter as a sort of epilogue with the final confrontations with different characters. This makes it, even though the book is pretty serious, all sort of neatly packaged, though not always perfectly predictable. In some parts yes.

You don't have to know much about McCarthy to know that things don't have at least any clear happy endings and concerning this that all serves a perfect purpose to make the journey of the main character more meaningful and effectual. Though personally I didn't care much about the main character or his journey and that was the problem, the biggest one, and I might not have any clear reason for it. Like said, the book might be somewhat too neat or even ordinary in a way, while I would prefer it to be raw and dirty and perhaps not quite so down-to-earth, or perhaps it is because of the character of John Grady Cole is the kind of 'good at everything, serious when need be and passionate when need be' type of ordinary guy, which I hardly ever find interesting. Rawlins is a kind of cliched as the companion for being the guy who is not so good at everything and always more vocal and raw though with a good heart, and Blevins seemed interesting, but was underdevelopment and left to background. Horses play a big part and that was another thing I didn't happen to care much about. All the poetic thoughts concerning them and what not. Just not my thing?

This novel even had a romance, but it was not only typical, but so underdeveloped and invisible, that I have a hard time seeing anybody caring much about it, or McCarthy putting in in the novel as anything more than a plot device. One of my favorite parts in the novel was when John Grady Cole talked with the judge at the very end, about how he felt actually bad about killing somebody during his time in the prison, even though he did it in self defense and about how wonders what the guy was alike in real life. I always like when things aren't brushed of as something completely unmeaningful, just because there was reasons for the action or because the other guy might have "deserved" it or something like that. Things like that would most likely still have effect on the person, because besides what the man was alike, killing is still after all killing and when someone dies that's just the very end of the person.

I'll have the next two parts of the trilogy between the same covers and I will read 'The Crossing', which I have higher expectations for, in near future. Perhaps then I'll be able to have more clearer thoughts about the dying land and finding the own place-type of themes McCarthy wrote about (I just didn't put much thought between the lines at this time plain as that), if that novel follows the same themes that is.
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Batman: The Long Halloween - Jeph Loeb, Tim Sale
Read: August
Rate:
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Read: August
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