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The End of the Affair

The End of the Affair
9.2 Rating
(6 ratings)

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57 votes
Impressive First Lines (29 items)
list by Dionysian Child
Published 5 years, 1 month ago 7 comments

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A diary of hate... or is it?

6 years, 7 months ago at Feb 5 14:12
My introduction to Graham Greene, and what an introduction. A passionate affair, broken up by a blitz bomb, that turns into jealousy and intrigue.

*SPOILER*

But in the most unexpected way, it turns out to be about love after all. And not just love between 2 people, but between man and God.

The character of Henry intrigues me now; nothing so ridiculous... read more
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Website: Amazon
Manufacturer: Penguin Books Ltd
Release date: 3 February 2000
ISBN-10 : 0140287868 | ISBN-13: 9780140287868
Novel (1)
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EvieBT added this to list 10 months, 2 weeks ago
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richard tong rated this 10/10 1 year, 2 months ago
Dionysian Child added this to a list 5 years, 1 month ago
Impressive First Lines (29 books items)

"'A story has no beginning or end; arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which to look ahead.' Graham Greene, The End of the Affair (1951)"


adsie posted a review 6 years, 7 months ago

A diary of hate... or is it?

“My introduction to Graham Greene, and what an introduction. A passionate affair, broken up by a blitz bomb, that turns into jealousy and intrigue.

*SPOILER*

But in the most unexpected way, it turns out to be about love after all. And not just love between 2 people, but between man and God.

The character of Henry intrigues me now; nothing so ridiculous as a jealous husband, as Greene says, but in some ways he seems to represent another kind of love, one that is self-effacing, that acts truly without thought for self.

The film with Ralph Fiennes and Julianne Moore is excellent, although they make the major change of having Sarah visit a priest rather than a humanist.” read more